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Netherlands ranked top for green mobility

Netherlands ranked top for green mobility

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Study by Heliox evaluated each country using a combination of criteria including access to public transportation, availability of green options and density of public EV charging stations.

Benelux countries have been named as the leading European nations for green transportation.

The research, covering all European nations places Netherlands as the top European nation with a sum total of 73 points, two points ahead of Luxembourg with Sweden, Germany and Estonia wrapping up the top five.

Sustainable mobility

The study conducted by Heliox, and which concluded in Q4 of 2021, evaluated each country using a combination of criteria including: access to public transportation; availability of green public transportation; density of public EV charging stations; economic incentives for sustainable mobility; and zero emission goals. The combined insights provided the best way for countries to demonstrate their commitment to green transport.

Although, according to the Top European Countries for Green Transport study, the UK has the second highest number of EVs out of 27 countries, it fared poorly in access to public transport, especially green alternatives. It also had a lower EV charger density by per square kilometre for its increasing number of EVs, therefore scraping into 10th spot.

In sharp contrast, the Netherlands led in three out of five criteria, and combined with an ambitious goal to become carbon neutral by 2050 and for all public transport buses to only drive on zero emissions by 2025, secured top slot for green transportation. 

Belgium, France, Slovenia, and Austria rounded out the top 10 list.

“This research casts a spotlight on those leading the charge in the electric transition, enabling other nations to follow in their footsteps”

Germany and the UK – typically considered leaders in the energy and electric transition, the report notes – were found struggling for a top five position despite a combined €200bn investment to meet net zero goals.

This left the space for Luxembourg and Sweden to rank above them despite much smaller investment sizes. For example, Germany intends to invest €60bn to reduce total GHG emissions by 80 per cent in 2050. Sweden on the other hand intends to reduce nearly the same amount of GHG emissions (85 per cent) by 2050 whilst investing only €72m, championing itself as a strong follow up to the Netherlands.

“It is clear that every country needs a multi-faceted approach to bring them a step closer to a zero-emission future,” said Michael Colijn, CEO of Heliox. “This research casts a spotlight on those leading the charge in the electric transition, enabling other nations to follow in their footsteps.”

He continued: “The Netherlands in particular is pushing forward innovation with the likes of the Transferium energy management ecosystem being one example, whilst at the same time the country is progressing with one of the world’s largest bus depot charge networks at Schiphol airport charging over 250 buses daily.”

“It is clear that every country needs a multi-faceted approach to bring them a step closer to a zero-emission future” 

Smaller countries are at the forefront when it comes to meeting the challenges of climate-neutral mobility in Europe, as per the research. Romania and Croatia for example ranked highly due to their unique zero emission grants for the purchasing of new or used clean alternative fuel personal vehicles, while Sweden and Luxembourg outpaced EU leaders thanks to a combination of their EV grant policies and dense EV charging networks.

The report found that economic incentives are paving the way for smaller nations, but public transport is another direction European countries can explore to reach net zero, with e-fleets representing a mere 2.1 per cent share of the average public transport system across the continent. The Netherlands championed this movement with 20 per cent of its buses being electric.

Bron: Smartcitiesworld

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